When at the same moment the tips of all four rods on a drift boat snap down and come alive like things possessed, some call it a fire drill. Some call it a clustermug. Others call it a cat’s cradle, the end result when several steelhead attached to fishing line take off in opposite directions. It’s quite spectacular, though hopeless, watching the fish leap high enough and far enough to clear the boat and crisscrossing lines back-and-forth. And it’s not all that uncommon.

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0 Comments | Posted in Trout and Salmon By Lindy

Through a wavering lens of low, clear water, they can see birds flitting through branches laden with snow, ducks swimming overhead, mink and otter skirting the pools. And you. All of those things and more can easily spook a dark, wintering steelhead. Take care. Rainbows run into rivers from the ocean or the Great Lakes in fall, then sit in pools all winter. They get antsy, waiting for warmer weather and longer days to deliver spawning conditions.

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0 Comments | Posted in Trout and Salmon By Lindy

The Columbia is a sea among rivers. Most of the famous salmon streams in the Northwest empty into this massive resource that drains an area the size of France, and the salmon that run here are funneled into the path of least resistance by the Columbia’s powerful currents.

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0 Comments | Posted in Trout and Salmon By Lindy

When steelhead begin moving out of the Great Lakes and into the rivers, it’s time to break out your floats and get ready to drift some baits. "It all starts with the salmon, after they move up into the rivers to spawn," said Jon Ray, a trout, salmon and steelhead specialist from Manistee, Michigan. "The steelhead begin showing up soon after, because of all the roe."

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0 Comments | Posted in Trout and Salmon By Lindy

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